10 Symbolisms In The Dawn Of The Planet of the Apes That Parallels the World We Live In

If you haven’t already watched the Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, I’d highly recommend that you do.

Apart from being a great movie, it was one that could have just as easily been a literature classic. The movie was overwhelmed with such jarring symbolisms that it’s hard to ignore the message or the general theme the movie was attempting to highlight.

For those who’ve already seen it, you might’ve noticed it too. And if you didn’t, or if you haven’t yet watched the film, here are 10 symbolisms from the Dawn of the Planet of the Apes that parallels the world we live in.

1. Be careful what you say. One point of view can change the way people (or animals) think about a group of beings

The leader of apes, Caesar, believed that mankind, as a whole is neither good nor evil; only an individual can be characterized as such. And that philosophy was generally passed down to the rest of the apes.

But when Koba – Caesars right hand man – was in charge, the majority of the ape population believed that humans were inherently evil because that was history Koba had with humans; he knew no other side of them.

We only have our point of view. And until we are definitively sure that it is in fact the truth, we should be careful when expressing them to others. For example, the Israeli-Palestine conflict, Democratic and Republican politics in the USA or the issue of our CPF funds being misappropriated, just to name a few.

2. For a brief period in the movie, it was people who were in cages

There was a line in the movie that went something along the lines of, “Now you know what it’s like to be caged up!”

Let’s face it. Majority of us will never know what it’s like to live in a cage. It is an experience exclusive to prisoners and animals. Yet here we are, so quick to stuff animals into confined spaces just so we can either ogle at them or so that we don’t have to deal with them.

3. The general population tends to follow a leader without any judgement

There is an infamous quote that goes, “Never underestimate the stupidity of the masses.”

In the movie, it showed how the apes would eventually follow the most alpha without any judgment. Then it showed how the humans did exactly the same.

We’ve all fallen into that trap countless of time. I think I’ve done it more that most. But it’s time we start thinking for ourselves, both critically and rationally. If not, there is no difference between animals and us.

4. You can’t always have the mentality of fighting for the ones you care about

If that’s what you’re doing, then I have news for you; so are they – whoever they may be. That was the underlying theme throughout the entire film.

This is the moral dilemma of the world we live in. Do we have the right to practice our way of life at the expense of others?

5. Power has the immense potential to corrupt a person

When he temporarily took over power, Caesar’s right hand man, Koba did the opposite of what he said he would do – protect the apes.

He led them to war, which some would argue was inevitable. (I can give them that.) But he was also willing to take the lives of other apes to exhibit dominance.

How many times have we seen this happen in our world?

6. Adding on to the previous point, the most important thing a leader should have is mental strength

Even in the ape world, it isn’t the strongest – physically – ape that’ll win a battle. It’s the one who knows when to fight, how to fight and how to be diplomatic even when it feels impossible.

7. We live in a time where trust is rarer than gold

Perhaps it’s the undercurrent of Capitalism. But it’s hard to assume that there isn’t an ulterior motive to anything someone else does.

However, if we carry on like that, cohabitating would be impossible. Then again, the history of humanity has never been peaceful to begin with.

8. Without weaponry, the victor may be different

Apes still fight it out through unarmed combat to determine the winner.

Imagine a world removed of all weapons. Would we still have the same superpowers, aggressors, and victims?

9. Without power, we are nothing

There was a line in the movie that really hit me. It was when someone said, “The worst part? They don’t need power to survive.” He was of course referring to the apes.

We have become so dependent on power that without it now, we might be worthless. That’s something to think about.

10. This world belongs to more than just one species

So we can’t live like it does.

 

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The Mansion by the corner of the road

We parked the car. Greeting us at the gate were two oversized St.Bernard’s, howling like werewolfs during a full moon. The gate was about twenty meters to the front door, which opened into the kitchen. Ahhh…the kitchen. Spacious, eclectic and bright with a beautiful ceramic island counter top in the middle of it. If the kitchen looked like that, I can only imagine what the rest of the house would look like. I was not to be disappointed. Not at all.

The kitchen was flanked by two beautifully crafted french doors that led seamlessly into the living room. I say living room because that’s what it’s supposed to be called, not what it actually is. One of the sofa sets faced the fireplace. The main sofa was grey and flanked by two orange cushion chairs. Above the fireplace was a life-sized abstract painting. It was the type of painting the average person, like you and I wouldn’t get but art enthusiasts will spend hours staring at it before bidding a million dollars for it. The second sofa set was sugar white and flanked by two velvet blue arm chairs that most grandparents would die for. Above it all, yet another abstract painting. This one is of a crushed soda can. Directly parallel to it was a long medieval dining table – the slab was the length of the tree it came from. None of the chairs matched each other nor the table it complimented. And finally, to the left of it all was a ping pong table and a bathroom that also had french doors. It was the most Elizabethan poop I ever took. Oh I almost forgot, there’s a swing in the middle of the living room…so…yeah.

The house had about 4 floors. I say about because it was hard to define what a floor was the way the house was built. The shelfs of the library was stacked with books from all genres, be it design to fiction, to cater to the taste of every visitor that has ever entered, and continue to enter of course. A picture of the female owner and Mick Jagger just chilling at a party stood atop one of the shelfs, just to provide an added opportunity for the layman to feel awestruck. Below was the male owners Emmy award for best design or something like that. I guess there is money to be made in the entertainment industry.

It was a mansion. And it was decked with everything luxurious. There was a heated salt water pool, a massage parlour, a walk-in closet the size of my house, a gym, an art gallery and anything else that screamed I’m not a middle income worker.

What a fucking house.

Why it’s good that we all don’t believe in the same thing

As the years keep rolling on, there appears to still be a sense of doubt in our minds. Now more than ever – as has been said before in every generation – we struggle to find the distinction between right from wrong. There is nothing that makes us more human than the inability to distinguish right from wrong.

Doubt. That is what it comes down to. Doubt from inexperience to be more precise.  We can turn to our gods, our logic, our parents or whoever we choose to seek counsel with but deep down we are all aware that no matter who gives us their suggested answer, it is hard to wholeheartedly believe it to be right since ultimately whatever they say will run through our individual filter more commonly known as our individual perspective.

I’m glad I don’t believe in all the same things as you. And you should be too.

Why?

Perhaps for the reason we learn to trust. If people – all of whom believe in different things – believe the same thing to be right, it is quite possibly the closest to the truth we may ever get to. Collective consensus.

Not believing in the same thing helps to rid ourselves of an evil intention – to have power over people. Power blinds us. It forces us to assume that things can only be accomplished at the expense of something or someone. But on the contrary, all our needs can be catered to and provided for if only we allow for everyones voice to be heard.

The question now becomes: How can we ensure our diversity is not adversarial but collective harmony in the quest to find the truth?